Now that I am getting comfortable with the rock shaping work (thanks to Griffin and Vernelson's video training), I am flexing my boldness and am considering taking on a complete hot tub-in-rock concept.

I have reviewed alot of drop-in style hot tubs but I really want to do the whole thing to look like one continuous slab of rock.

Issues:
Can I make an egronomically shaped pool (comfort)?
If I set the bottom half in the ground and support the top half with footers, rebar and lathe, will I have a sound pool (structural)?
Do I need to consider chemical action/reaction to the cement finish? What is the best way to seal it? Will stain color bleach out over time?

If anyone would like to add their input, all would be appreciated.
Thanks,
Ed

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You may want to consider foam for sub straights as apposed to rebar construction. This should save you money and give you some flexibility for removable sections ie. access to pumps ect, and God forbid a broken pipe. I haven't heard much on chemical issues...I know there is more chlorine in hot tubs but haven't had any issues with it. Red is the only color that you may have a problem with as far as color fades.
Hi Nathan,
I plan to use scrap foam and spray foam insulation (Great Stuff - works like glue) in the overall construction. Then use rebar throughout the tub area and larger rock formation in rear section. I plan to keep the back hollow for the utilities.
In reference to your recommendation to use foam for sub straights, are you referring to yet something else?
Thanks for the replies.
Ed

P.S. I have successfully used LEDs underwater and plan to incorporate reds, whites and blues on this design. If you or anyone wish to discuss the use of LEDs then maybe we can start another discussion.

VerticalArtisans.com said:
You may want to consider foam for sub straights as apposed to rebar construction. This should save you money and give you some flexibility for removable sections ie. access to pumps ect, and God forbid a broken pipe. I haven't heard much on chemical issues...I know there is more chlorine in hot tubs but haven't had any issues with it. Red is the only color that you may have a problem with as far as color fades.
Froth-Pac 180 from Dow....Im using it now and will have it on video soon
$400!!! Ouch! Well, after reading about it I am already starting to see the possibilities. I can't wait to see the video.

VerticalArtisans.com said:
Froth-Pac 180 from Dow....Im using it now and will have it on video soon
Ed I got a training video from Richard Winget. In his training DVD he addresses the problems you are about to face. Contact him, he will probably help you.
Greetings,
This is a great topic, and I will be following it as it develops. I wish I had more specific tech info to pass along, but I will share a couple thoughts.
Regarding the chemical issue, chlorine and bromine are pretty aggressive oxidizers, and are rough on nearly everything they contact, including the people who use it. Many hot tub users now prefer u.v. sterilizers to keep the water sanitary. I would suggest that angle, as it is better for the users skin and health, it smells much better, and is more gentle on all the surfaces and mechanical components.
I have in my possession a photo of a cool hot tub made in Telluride, CO that started with a 5 ton boulder, with about 2 tons removed from the center to reveal the finished product. Very cool, but imagine what is possible with our materials/process with so much less machinery and grief, and so much more design potential. I will try to scan that photo and send it along to all of you.
Thanks for the info on the UV filter. I have read up on them. Yes, I agree, that has got to be the only way to go!
Well, still no job to do the big tub.

Just a side note, on my last few waterfeatures, i have incorporated LEDs throughout. I added a white LED in the supply pipe and got amazing results. The spilling water is lit! Must get a video and post it.

David D Driggs said:
Greetings,
This is a great topic, and I will be following it as it develops. I wish I had more specific tech info to pass along, but I will share a couple thoughts.
Regarding the chemical issue, chlorine and bromine are pretty aggressive oxidizers, and are rough on nearly everything they contact, including the people who use it. Many hot tub users now prefer u.v. sterilizers to keep the water sanitary. I would suggest that angle, as it is better for the users skin and health, it smells much better, and is more gentle on all the surfaces and mechanical components.
I have in my possession a photo of a cool hot tub made in Telluride, CO that started with a 5 ton boulder, with about 2 tons removed from the center to reveal the finished product. Very cool, but imagine what is possible with our materials/process with so much less machinery and grief, and so much more design potential. I will try to scan that photo and send it along to all of you.
David I would like to see that photo. I would also like to see the finished project Ed. Let us know how this comes out.

Ed Warren said:
Thanks for the info on the UV filter. I have read up on them. Yes, I agree, that has got to be the only way to go!
Well, still no job to do the big tub.

Just a side note, on my last few waterfeatures, i have incorporated LEDs throughout. I added a white LED in the supply pipe and got amazing results. The spilling water is lit! Must get a video and post it.

David D Driggs said:
Greetings,
This is a great topic, and I will be following it as it develops. I wish I had more specific tech info to pass along, but I will share a couple thoughts.
Regarding the chemical issue, chlorine and bromine are pretty aggressive oxidizers, and are rough on nearly everything they contact, including the people who use it. Many hot tub users now prefer u.v. sterilizers to keep the water sanitary. I would suggest that angle, as it is better for the users skin and health, it smells much better, and is more gentle on all the surfaces and mechanical components.
I have in my possession a photo of a cool hot tub made in Telluride, CO that started with a 5 ton boulder, with about 2 tons removed from the center to reveal the finished product. Very cool, but imagine what is possible with our materials/process with so much less machinery and grief, and so much more design potential. I will try to scan that photo and send it along to all of you.
Seems like a lot of work for something that wont be as comfortable or efficient as a fiberglass spa. Many guys have trying doing what you are thinking and went broke doing it. And there end result was hokey looking.

considering hot tubs.  did you all ever come up with something on this?

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