I have a customer who had asked about possible options for the exposed chimney pipe from a wood burning stove on the exterior of the house. I know the local building code for framing clearance, though I would love to hear what you guys have to say about what the best way to enclose it properly for a vert carve.
Obviously I want it structurally sound and most of all safe.

The big question I have is, does the high heat from the stove have any effect on the cured mix? I recal Jeff (kirtbag) describing the "lie" content in concrete reacts to the heat and there is little to no lie in most carving mixes. (I could be completely off)
I know that I've seen many different pics of carving on fireplaces and fire pits, so I guess I want hear from the pros. I want to feel confident enough in the product enough where I can explain to a customer how and why it will work.

Has anyone done an enclosure such as this??

Thank you

-Ryan

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Hey ryan, I believe the limestone in concrete gets hot and cracks, pops, and crac2ks the concrete. Most vert mixes dont have limestone agg in it. High heat can effect any type of concrete adversly. Hope everything is good with ya.

Ryan.  Is this outside the home or inside?  I am not sure I follow.  As for the heat involved, most issues occur once over 600 degrees.  Sounds like that is not going to be the case for you. Mortar itself is pretty heat resistant.  Think about what chimneys are made of now.  Brick and basic mortar and exposed to a fair amount of heat except and the firebox itself. Jeff was right, vertical mixes can do fairly well.

LOL, you could have asked this one earlier today when you placed the order! 

Take care.

Don

Ryan, not quite sure either about the specifics of your work, but regarding heat resistance, coincidentally that`s what I`m doing right now, the use of firebricks, and a refractory mortar in both cases yours and mine, is the way to go about this. looking into topic, I`ve learnt that a mix of these proportions would be heat resistant:

1.5 parts portland cement

2 parts silica sand

1.5 parts perlite

2 parts fire clay

Thus what Don states above, which somehow corresponds with engredients of carving mix. Do not fire the work right after finishing. Let a week pass by, then start little fires with, newspapers, for a few days, before you give it the real hot fire, just to set the materials gradually, you know.

Thank guys,
I've got a hearth to build at my house, a rather large 7'x7' platform. But a potential paying project enclosing a exterior chimney pipe. Just wanted to make sure I've got my head on straight before I go selling the job!

Jeff- think I showed u a pic of the stove a while back, I only think about it when my wife brings it up at 9pm when I'm ready to collapse! :)

Don- that's why I didn't bring it up during the day!

Nelson- thanks, good luck with your project, hope to see pics!

Tru Pac/Walttools/Don said:

Ryan.  Is this outside the home or inside?  I am not sure I follow.  As for the heat involved, most issues occur once over 600 degrees.  Sounds like that is not going to be the case for you. Mortar itself is pretty heat resistant.  Think about what chimneys are made of now.  Brick and basic mortar and exposed to a fair amount of heat except and the firebox itself. Jeff was right, vertical mixes can do fairly well.

LOL, you could have asked this one earlier today when you placed the order! 

Take care.

Don

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